The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability, Jasbir K. Puar (2017)

I missed this one from last year, but it looks great.

  • Description

    In The Right to Maim Jasbir K. Puar brings her pathbreaking work on the liberal state, sexuality, and biopolitics to bear on our understanding of disability. Drawing on a stunning array of theoretical and methodological frameworks, Puar uses the concept of “debility”—bodily injury and social exclusion brought on by economic and political factors—to disrupt the category of disability. She shows how debility, disability, and capacity together constitute an assemblage that states use to control populations. Puar’s analysis culminates in an interrogation of Israel’s policies toward Palestine, in which she outlines how Israel brings Palestinians into biopolitical being by designating them available for injury. Supplementing its right to kill with what Puar calls the right to maim, the Israeli state relies on liberal frameworks of disability to obscure and enable the mass debilitation of Palestinian bodies. Tracing disability’s interaction with debility and capacity, Puar offers a brilliant rethinking of Foucauldian biopolitics while showing how disability functions at the intersection of imperialism and racialized capital.

    About The Author(s)

    Jasbir K. Puar is Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University and the author of Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times, also published by Duke University Press.
  • Preface: Hands Up, Don’t Shoot!  ix
    Acknowledgments  xxv
    Introduction: The Cost of Getting Better  1
    1. Bodies with New Organs: Becoming Trans, Becoming Disabled  33
    2. Crip Nationalism: From Narrative Prosthesis to Disaster Capitalism  63
    3. Disabled Diaspora, Rehabilitating State: The Queer Politics of Reproduction in Palestine/Israel  95
    4. “Will Not Let Die”: Debilitation and Inhuman Biopolitics in Palestine  127
    Postscript: Treatment without Checkpoints  155
    Notes  163
    Bibliography  223
    Index  261

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